Acidulants

More applications, more benefits

acidulants
acidulants

Acidulants

More applications, more benefits

Acidulants

Acidulants bring a range of functionality to applications, from providing tartness and enhancing flavour to extending shelf life by controlling pH which is an important contribution to managing growth of microorganisms.

Acidulants, or food acids, have very different taste profiles. The most common, citric acid, has a lemony taste, while acetic acid has the familiar vinegar flavour. Tartaric acid gives a sharp taste that only lasts for a very short time, while malic acid has a sharp taste with a much slower build up. Lactic acid has a taste that is relatively mild and lingering.

The acids also dissolve differently. For example, when an acidulant is used with a raising agent to produce carbon dioxide, it is best to use one with a low solubility such as fumaric acid, or a slow-release acid like glucono-delta-lactone, rather than the more common citric or malic acids.

Some acids, particularly citric and tartaric, can also trap traces of metals in the food that can cause the oxidation reactions that cause foods to go off.