Sucralose Supplier

Artificial sweetener that often comes in a yellow packet

Sucralose - ingreland
Sucralose

Sucralose Supplier

Artificial sweetener that often comes in a yellow packet

What is Sucralose?

Sucralose is an artificial sweetener that is made from sugar. It is commonly used as a sugar substitute in foods and beverages, as it is much sweeter than sugar but contains no calories. Sucralose was discovered in 1976 by researchers at the University of London who were working on developing new pesticides. During their research, they accidentally discovered that sucralose was extremely sweet, even though it had no caloric value.

Sucralose is made by modifying sugar molecules to replace three hydrogen-oxygen groups with chlorine atoms. This modification makes the sucralose molecule much more stable and resistant to breakdown during digestion, which is why it has no caloric value.

Sucralose is about 600 times sweeter than sugar and has a clean, sweet taste with no aftertaste. It is often used in combination with other sweeteners, such as erythritol or stevia, to improve the taste and texture of foods and beverages.

Sucralose is approved for use in many countries, including the United States, Canada, the European Union, and Australia. It is used in a wide variety of products, including soft drinks, baked goods, chewing gum, and many other foods and beverages.

Origin

Sucralose was discovered in 1976 by a team of researchers at the British company and the University of London. The researchers were working on developing new pesticides by modifying sugar molecules when they discovered that one of the modified molecules was extremely sweet, even though it had no caloric value.

After further research, the team discovered that the modified sugar molecule, now known as sucralose, was not only incredibly sweet but also stable and heat-resistant, making it an ideal sugar substitute for use in processed foods and beverages.

Sucralose was approved for use in Canada in 1991 and in the United States in 1998. Since then, it has been approved for use in many other countries, including the European Union, Australia, and Japan. Today, sucralose is used in a wide variety of food and beverage products around the world.

Commercial Production of Sucralose

Sucralose is commercially produced using a multi-step process that starts with regular table sugar (sucrose). Here are the basic steps involved in the commercial production of sucralose:

  1. Modification of sucrose: The first step is to modify sucrose by replacing three hydrogen-oxygen groups with chlorine atoms. This is done by adding sucrose to a mixture of water and chemicals, including acetic anhydride, hydrogen chloride, and toluene.
  2. Purification: The resulting mixture is purified through a series of chemical reactions and separations to isolate the sucralose molecule.
  3. Crystallization: The purified sucralose is then crystallized and dried to produce a fine powder.
  4. Packaging: Finally, the powder is packaged and shipped to food and beverage manufacturers around the world.

Function

The primary function of sucralose is as a high-intensity, zero-calorie sweetener. Sucralose is approximately 600 times sweeter than sugar, so only a tiny amount is needed to achieve the desired level of sweetness in foods and beverages. Because it has no caloric value and does not raise blood sugar levels, it is often used as a sugar substitute in low-calorie and low-carbohydrate products.

Sucralose is also highly stable and does not break down at high temperatures, so it can be used in a wide range of food processing applications, including baking, canning, and pasteurization. Additionally, sucralose does not react with other food ingredients or alter the flavor of foods and beverages, making it a versatile and popular sweetener in the food industry.

Sucralose can also be used as a bulking agent to replace the volume and texture of sugar in some products, and it can enhance the flavor of some foods and beverages when used in combination with other sweeteners.

Sucralose Application

Sucralose is widely used in the food and beverage industry as a sugar substitute and high-intensity sweetener. Some of the most common applications of sucralose include:

  1. Soft drinks and carbonated beverages: Sucralose is often used to sweeten soft drinks and carbonated beverages, including colas, lemon-lime sodas, and flavored waters.
  2. Baked goods: Sucralose is heat-stable and does not break down during baking, so it is often used as a sugar substitute in cakes, cookies, and other baked goods.
  3. Dairy products: Sucralose can be used to sweeten dairy products, including yogurt, ice cream, and milk-based drinks.
  4. Tabletop sweeteners: Sucralose is available in packets or bulk containers for use as a tabletop sweetener for coffee, tea, and other beverages.
  5. Jams, jellies, and other sweet spreads: Sucralose can be used to sweeten jams, jellies, and other sweet spreads without adding extra calories.
  6. Condiments and sauces: Sucralose can be used to sweeten ketchup, barbecue sauce, and other condiments and sauces.
  7. Nutritional supplements: Sucralose is used as a sweetener in some nutritional supplements, including protein powders and weight-loss products.

Sucralose is often used in combination with other sweeteners, such as aspartame and acesulfame potassium, to create a sweet taste profile that closely mimics the taste of sugar. Because it is calorie-free and does not affect blood sugar levels, it is particularly popular in low-calorie and low-carbohydrate products.

Product Range

  • Sucralose FCC
  • Sucralose USP-NF
  • Sucralose EP

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